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  1. Continued glacier mass loss in 2015 and 2016

    Based on last year’s call-for-data we can announce that the glaciers around the globe are reported to continue losing mass at very high rates. For the observation period 2014/15, the average annual mass balance of the observed glaciers was -1.1 m w.e. This is already the fourth year since...

  2. Scientists to study impact of climate change on Arctic ecosystem

    A University of Manchester scientist is part of a team led by the University of Liverpool working on a £2.6m project to explore how the ecosystems in the Arctic Ocean are being altered by climate change. Funded by the Natural and Environmental Research Council (NERC), ocean scientists...

  3. IBRU releases new Arctic map with sea ice changes

    International Boundaries Research Unit (IBRU) of Durham University has released a new version of its widely used Arctic map. The maps may be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/ibru/resources/arctic/. IBRU’s original Arctic map, first released in 2008 and revised several times since, was a...

  4. Arctic melt ponds form when meltwater clogs ice pores

    When spring comes to the Arctic, the breakup of the cold winter ice sheets starts at the surface with the formation of melt ponds. These pools of melted snow and ice darken the surface of the ice, increasing the amount of solar energy the ice sheet absorbs and accelerating melt. A team...

  5. Call for contributions to the 4th Relate North publication

    This will be the fourth book published in the Relate North series of Arctic Sustainable Arts & Design Thematic Network of University of Arctic (ASAD).  Relate North is an English language, peer-reviewed publication. The terms ‘arts’ and ‘design’ should be...

  6. 2016 Sea Ice Outlook Post-Season Report Now Available

    The Sea Ice Prediction Network (SIPN) announces availability of the 2016 Arctic Sea Ice Outlook (SIO) Post-Season Report! The full report and highlights are available at: https://www.arcus.org/sipn/sea-ice-outlook/2016/post-season. The SIO is an activity of the Sea Ice Prediction Network...

  7. The Balance of Ice, Waves, and Winds in the Arctic Autumn

    One of the most notable signals of rapid change in the Arctic is the loss of sea ice during summer months [Jeffries et al., 2013; Wang and Overland, 2012]. Not only does the ice cover less area during the summer, it’s also growing thinner [e.g., Stroeve and Notz, 2015]. Scientists have...

  8. New Icy Island Forms as Arctic Glacier Retreats

    As Coronation Glacier on Canada's Baffin Island retreats, it has left behind a new island. The island, detected with satellite imagery, is made of loose dirt and rocks deposited by the slow-moving river of ice. Typically, a glacial island like this will erode away after the glacier stops...

  9. Call for Abstracts - Arctic Yearbook 2017

    The Arctic Yearbook (www.arcticyearbook.com) is calling for abstracts for the 2017 edition. The Arctic Yearbook is an international and peer-reviewed volume which focuses on issues of regional governance, circumpolar relations, geopolitics and security, all broadly defined. It is an open...

  10. Call for NPRB Panel Nominations

    The North Pacific Research Board (NPRB) is seeking nominations to its Advisory and Science Panels for 2017. Four seats for the Science Panel and four seats for the Advisory Panel will become available on 1 June 2017. Science Panel Qualifications: The Science Panel advises the Board on science...

  11. Scientists blast federal fish council for Bering Sea data gap

    Although Bering Sea pollock stocks remain strong and the huge multi-million dollar commercial fishing quota was increased this month by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council, the federal panel's scientific advisors issued a report complaining about the lack of data on declining...

  12. Arctic sea ice loss impacts beluga whale migration

    The annual migration of some beluga whales in Alaska is altered by sea ice changes in the Arctic, while other belugas do not appear to be affected. A new study led by the University of Washington finds that as Arctic sea ice takes longer to freeze up each fall due to climate change, one...

  13. The Arctic Is Getting Crazy

    In the past year the climate in the Arctic has at times bordered on the absurd. Temperatures were 30 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit above average in some places during the recent Christmas week. Through November the area of ice-covered ocean in the region reached a record low in seven of 11...

  14. Lake Affect

    A study of 13,000 lakes throughout the Arctic finds that ice-out could occur as much as month earlier each spring in the decades to come. Such changes would result in increased levels of greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere and affect the livelihoods of nearby communities that rely on lakes...